Big Girls Don’t Cry Lyrics-
By BobCrewe & Bob Gaudia

Big girls don’t cry
Big girls don’t cry

Big girls don’t cry-yi-yi (they don’t cry)
Big girls don’t cry (who said they don’t cry?)
My girl said goodbye-yi-yi (my oh my)
My girl didn’t cry (I wonder why)

(Silly boy) told my girl we had to break up
(Silly boy) hoped that she would call my bluff
(Silly boy) then she said to my surprise
“Big girls don’t cry?
Big girls don’t cry-yi-yi (they don’t cry)
Big girls don’t cry (who said they don’t cry?)

(Maybe) I was cru-u-uel (I was cruel)
Baby I’m a fool (I’m such a fool)

(Silly girl) “Shame on you?your mama said
(Silly girl) “Shame on you, you’re cryin?in bed? (Silly girl)
“Shame on you, you told me lies? Big girls do cry

Big girls don’t cry-yi-yi (they don’t cry)
Big girls don’t cry (that’s just an alibi)
Big girls don’t cry
Big girls don’t cry
Big girls don’t cry
Big girls don’t cry
Big girls don’t cry

From Wikipedia:

“Big Girls Don’t Cry” is a song written by Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio and originally recorded by The Four Seasons. It hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 17, 1962, and, like its predecessor “Sherry”, spent five weeks in the top position. The song also made it to number one, for three weeks, on Billboard’s Rhythm and Blues survey.

According to Gaudio, he was dozing off while watching the John Payne/Rhonda Fleming/Ronald Reagan movie Tennessee’s Partner (1955) when he heard Payne’s character slap Fleming in the face. After the slap, Fleming’s character replied, “Big girls don’t cry.” Gaudio wrote the line on a scrap of paper, fell asleep, and wrote the song the next morning.[1][2]

However, the now-famous line does not appear in the Ronald Reagan film. According to Bob Crewe, he himself was dozing off in his Manhattan home with the television on when he awoke to see John Payne manhandling Rhonda Fleming in a 1956 film noir Slightly Scarlet. The line is heard in that film based on a James M. Cain story.

Like “Sherry”, “Big Girls Don’t Cry” is sung mostly in falsetto. With this song, the Four Seasons became the first rock-era act to hit the top spot on the Hot 100 with their first two chart entries (their first single, “Bermuda”/”Spanish Lace”, did not appear on any Billboard chart in 1961).

The song has also appeard in the soundtrack to 1987’s Dirty Dancing